McCulloh Lab People

Kate McCulloh with balsa Kate McCulloh
Assistant Professor
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: kmcculloh <at> wisc.edu
Office: 324 Birge
Phone:  +1 608 890 3042

Mailing address:
430 Lincoln Dr
Madison, WI 53706

Kate’s CV

 

Maegan Gagne Maegan Gagne
Graduate Student
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: magagne <at> wisc.edu

My research interests are broadly in tree ecophysiology and how woody plants are affected by the stressors brought on by a changing climate. My research project will be focused on boreal tree species in northern WI and how they have been, and will be affected by rising temperatures. My research will focus on species, such as white and black spruce, that have already shown an adverse response in growth to climate change. I am interested in studying the mechanisms and further the trade-offs between carbon storage capacity and resistance to hydraulic failure resulting from both freeze-thaw and drought-induced embolism.

 

Katelyn Geleynse Katelyn Geleynse
Graduate Student
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: geleynse <at> wisc.edu

My research will focus on the role of fog water in mitigating the effects of drought on coastal tree species.  It is thought that fog water can 1) be taken up directly via foliage and used to refill embolized xylem conduits, 2) largely eliminate atmospheric vapor pressure deficit that drives evaporation and transpiration and/or 3) accumulate on leaf surfaces and drip down to soil.  These mechanisms will be studied in the Lake Superior system (and potentially the South African fynbos system) where fog is a regular occurrence.

 

Kim O'Keefe  Kim O'Keefe
Research Associate
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: okeefe4 <at> wisc.edu

As a plant ecophysiologist, I am broadly interested in studying the functional relationship between plants and their environment. My research has three goals: 1) improve fine-scale spatiotemporal resolution of water movement through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC); 2) elucidate physiological mechanisms of woody and herbaceous species coexistence in grasslands; and 3) understand physiological responses of plants to climate variability. I use a variety of techniques to address my research questions, including leaf gas exchange, sap flow sensors, stable isotopes, and hydraulic measurements. Although my research has primarily focused on grasslands, I am interested in addressing similar questions in other systems as well.

 Check out my work at kimokeefe.weebly.com


Amanda Salvi
Graduate Student
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: asalvi <at> wisc.edu

My research interests focus on how aspects of leaf architecture and anatomy have evolved as adaptations to the environment in which they are found. Questions I ask include how certain leaf traits affect photosynthetic and hydraulic abilities, what is the extent of plasticity in these traits, and what are the trade-offs between one trait vs. another. My research project, with these questions in mind, will look at species of Eucalyptus along a rainfall gradient in Australia.

 

Duncan Smith  Duncan Smith
Research Associate
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: ddsmith3 <at> wisc.edu

Duncan's CV

The coordination of plant architecture, xylem anatomy and stomatal responses represents a "hydraulic strategy" that should greatly influence a plant's ability to survive. I am interested in the strategies that different species of plants employ that allow them to succeed under varied environmental conditions. Much of my PhD work focused on plants experiencing more or less ideal conditions but in the McCulloh lab I will address responses to drought and its alleviation. Understanding these responses will be increasingly important to predict landscape-level changes in a warming climate. These issues will be addressed through field and lab studies and modeling.

Alex Wenthe  Alex Wenthe
Graduate Student
Department of Botany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Email: aewenthe <at> wisc.edu

I am excited to be pursuing a master’s of Ecological Restoration in the McCulloh Lab. My coursework will focus on the native species and natural communities of Wisconsin and the Upper Midwest. My research project is based at Waubesa Wetlands State Natural Area and involves the digital mapping, plant surveying, and remote sensing of this wetland gem. I currently work in the Bureau of Natural Heritage Conservation at the WDNR in a program that encourages private landowners to manage for native and rare species. When I’m not learning or working, I like to just hang out with my wife Tori, and cat Roxy, at our west side home. For fun I also like to ride my bike, go camping, and burn oak woodlands (but usually not all at the same time).

Former Lab Members

Kelly Kerr Kelly Kerr
Masters degree, 2014